Pilates Pioneer Square Seattle

The Benefits of Pilates – Move Like a Cat, Plus More

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According to this Time article Pilates has a multitude of benefits:

  • MOVE LIKE A CAT, i.e., increased sensory awareness or mindfulness
  • improved posture
  • improved overall body control (ever knock yourself over by kicking or punching too hard in kickboxing class?)
  • reduced low back pain
  • increased flexibility
  • increased trunk stability
  • increased athletic performance
  • reduced injury risk
  • improved mood
  • reduced stress (tip: break up your workday and swing by BTP for a midday pilates class, AKA – stress buster)
  • more symmetrical body
  • weight loss (strength training elevates your resting metabolism rate, burn more calories while you sleep!)

Pilates not painkillers the best cure for backache

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According to the World Health Organization the lifetime prevalence of low back pain is 60-70%. This is significant. Unfortunately, for too many people the first intervention for back pain are NSAIDs. While these drugs may help temporarily, they do little to address the underlying issues that cause back pain. A Sunday Times article recently reviewed a study that suggests that the most effective treatments for back pain are exercise and psychological therapy, with exercise being used to treat the underlying condition and psychological therapy used to assist with pain management.

“Anti-inflammatory pills such as ibuprofen are widely used as a first choice for patients with lower back pain. However, scientists found that they made so little difference that most people would not notice the effect. Exercise is usually recommended instead, which for some patients could include Pilates, yoga or stretching.”

Read more here.

Transversus Abdominis Tutorial

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Those of you who have taken Pilates at Bodytonic are use to receiving lots of cueing for Trasversus Abdominis (TVA). TVA is the most frequently referred to “core muscle”. BTP students know that TVA wraps laterally around ones abdomen from the bottom of the ribcage to the crest of the pelvis and that it works to stabilize the spine by compressing the abdomen and also aids in forced expiration. For some, this description “clicks” quickly, but for those of you who would like a more thorough description with visual aids, here is video that may help:

 

Tips for exercising in your 30s, 40s, 50s, and 60s

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30s

  • “Exercise in intense bursts at 80 to 95 percent of your max, interspersed with recovery pauses to allow your heart rate to return to normal.”
  • “Aim to exercise five times a week with one day reserved for high intensity cardio (at least 45 minutes).”
  • “Your exercise regimen should also include balance and flexibility training.”

40s

  • “Continue training with weights three to four times a week, and up the cardio to five times a week, reserving one day for rest.”
  • “In terms of strength training, remember quality over quantity. Focus on doing the movements slowly and with control.”
  • “Maintaining or improving flexibility will be crucial in the years ahead.”

50s

  • “Focus on saving your back by strengthening your core muscles and keeping good posture. Yoga and Pilates are helpful for both.”
  • “You will also need additional recovery time after a hard workout, so go easy — aim to exercise more frequently but with a moderate level of intensity.”
  • “Ideally, get in a half-hour of cardio every day.”

60s

  • “Weight training is a must, ideally three times a week, alternating between upper and lower body muscle groups and using light weights.”
  • “Incorporate balance exercises and stretch, stretch, stretch.”
  • “Aim for three days a week of moderately intense cardio.”

Read more here.

 

Vintage Footage – The Wunda Chair

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Make More Time – Become a Morning Person

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In theme with our recent articles on making time for exercise in our busy lives, is a recent Huffington Post article with 6 tips to become a morning person. If unlike myself, you don’t have a toddler who wakes you up between 5:00am – 6:00am, these tips may come in really handy.

  1. Calculate your ideal bedtime.
  2. Identify your stay-awake triggers.
  3. Create a morning to-do list.
  4. Reward yourself.
  5. Exercise
  6. Ask yourself, “Why do you want to do this?”

Read more here.

Seattle, the 8th Healthiest City in the Nation

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According to the American College of Sports Medicine, Seattle is the 8th healthiest city in the Nation. Our neighbors to the south, Portland rank just above as the 7th healthiest city and Washington D.C. ranks as the top healthy city in the nation.

According to the index Seattle can improve in the following areas:

  • Eat more fruit and vegetables
  • Quit Smoking
  • Build more swimming pools
  • Build more rec centers

Read all the index component here

Another Benefit of Mini-Workouts

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Exercising can be really intimidating, especially for populations that have poor health habits, lack of exercise aside. However more research is showing that even a little exercise can improve health outcomes for these populations. One such population are smokers. A study that followed nearly half a million Taiwainese smokers over 12 years found that smokers who exercised for just 15 minutes per day were 55% more successful at quitting smoking and 44% less likely to relapse. Just 15 minutes!!

Other similar studies have found:

  • Smokers who are exercises 30-minutes per day increased their life expectancy by 3.7 years
  • Ex-smokers who exercised 30-minutes per day increased their life expectancy by 5.6 years and reduced their risk of death by 43%

Read more details here

30 minutes sessions at Bodytonic range from $40-45 per session.

Bridging Then and Now

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Vintage Mat Class

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Here is a look at an original Pilates Mat Class taught by the one and only Joseph Pilates. This video and is both interesting and funn(y) to watch. Both beginning and advanced Pilates students will recognize some of the exercises taught in this video. The well seasoned Pilates practitioner will notice some modern kinesiology and biomechanics inspired adaptions absent from this video. For example, JP provides a cardio warm up in which he bounces on the balls of his feet while in plantar flexion. Nope. Don’t do it. 🙂

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